sábado, 9 de marzo de 2013

"tengo 42 años estoy casada y soy trabajadora sexual" Nikki Cox

 Os dejo otro testimonio de otra mujer que ejerce la prostitución con 42 años. ¿por qué se empeñan en no reconocer que somos capaces de tomar decisiones y que somos muchas mujeres que preferimos ejercer la prostitución antes que otros trabajos y además ya no nos avergonzamos y somos felices?


Nikki Lee4 days ago Hello – I’m Nikki Cox – the Sex Worker featured in this introductory portion of the Australian Women’s Weekly article “When Sex is Your Day Job”. Myself, along with 4 of my Sex Worker sisters – Artemesia, Sandi, Rachel and Laurell were extended the honour of being interviewed and photographed by the magazine for this Real Life feature article & we thank the Australian Women’s Weekly and Caroline Overington in particular for being progressive enough to want to help create an understanding of us as real live Women. We accepted this honour of being interviewed because it was intended to bring to light the issue of the Queensland Government passing an anti-discrimination law in November 2012 which makes it lawful to discriminate against us - a set group of people who are a minority group - in regards to accommodation. The Government has made it so that any accommodation providers in Queensland can deny or evict a suspected Sex Worker from any form of rented premises, not just motel and hotels but our rental homes, apartments and business premises – whether we are working from these accommodations or travelling on personal family business just because we are Sex Workers. This kind of discrimination has not existed in regards to accommodation since the 1970’s when people of Aboriginal origin were not permitted to rent a motel room. They can also legally treat us unfairly in the process of denying and/or evicting us from said premises. This has all come about because one sex worker stood up for her legal rights and won an anti-discrimination case against a Queensland motel. The Qld Attorney-General Jarrod Bleijie didn’t like this, so he decided he would use his political power to change what he didn’t like. He didn’t stop to think that we run businesses too. His stand is that he needs to protect the majority from the minority and that if we don’t like it – leave the industry. The anti-discrimination legislation now directly discriminates against us in regards to accommodation and working from said accommodation yet other occupations such as photographers, media, politicians, travelling salesmen, employment recruiters conducting job interviews can and do work from private homes and apartments, motel and hotel rooms and rented business premises – yet we can be removed from all these places based on our occupation. Legal sole operator Sex Workers have been recognized as a person before the law under the Qld Prostitution Act since 1999 and in doing this it afforded us with more equal protection in regards to human and civil rights. Prostitution is a lawful occupation and is federally recognized by the Australian Taxation Office. Please read the whole article in the March issue of the magazine as our attempt at awareness has seemed to have gotten lost in the age old debate about Sex Workers. Like technology – we have evolved. I am not going to address any individual person’s opinion – it is your opinion and in my world – I believe that everyone has the right to their opinion. I know nothing of your life or current stressors therefore I have no right to comment on your opinion based on my momentary reaction in reading them as there may be more going on in your life that caused you to vent your dislike, discomfort and hatred of what I represent. I do wish to address directly is to correct 2 errors. I was 25 when I saw my first client not 23 years old and secondly my husband is no longer in the US Navy – he works domestically here in Australia. People ask me why did I become a sex worker – my answer is simple: Why else does somebody work? Money! I work to earn a living. I had no other reason for entering this industry – sorry for being so boring. I do enjoy meeting new people & I enjoy the freedom this job enables me to have. I enjoy my lovely peer Sex Worker friends and the community we have built. Not long ago, we were working in complete darkness and separation – nobody knew anybody else and we had no support – no one to turn to. Since the inception of social media – we have been able to come together and love and support each other and create a sisterhood and brotherhood of sex workers. The sex industry is messy and complicated and is weakened by inequality. We can work together towards a better future for the sex industry and for the people who choose to work within this industry through education, understanding and tolerance. I am passionate about the sex industry. I care deeply for its wellbeing and for its future because it is my future and I will continue to be heard whether people want to listen to me or not. We are here – we have always been here and we always will be here. By the Qld Government selecting a minority group such as Sex Workers and by saying it is ok to discriminate against us and to treat us “unfavourably” in the process is just not the Australian way. Thank you for reading the article :)

I'm 42, married and a sex worker

 

By Caroline Overington
Thursday, February 28, 2013


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I'm 42, married and a sex worker
Nikki Cox.
 http://aww.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=8617465
What do you think when you think about prostitutes? Do you think: women in high heels, standing under red street lights? Do you think: women so damaged and drug-addicted, they must have no choice other than to sell themselves? Well, then, meet Nikki Cox.
Nikki will this year celebrate — quite literally, since she loves her job — her 17th year as a sex worker (it's a term she and all the women in this story prefer, since "prostitute" has negative connotations).
Nikki is out and proud about her profession. Her whole family knows what she does. She's been taking money for sex since she was 23 years old. She's now 42 and she has no plans to retire any time soon.
"I used to own a hairdressing salon," Nikki says. "I wasn't making much money. I was doing tax returns to make extra. Then I got engaged and I was going to get married, but the guy I was engaged to had never had sex before. I was worried he might stray after we got married, so I sent him to see a local sex worker."
It worked out pretty well. One might say it worked out far too well because, the next thing Nikki knew, her fiancé was dating that sex worker on the side. Nikki marched down to the brothel and demanded to see the manager.
"She was as outraged as I was," Nikki says. "It's absolutely unprofessional! But anyway, we got talking and I really liked this woman — she was strong and confident, independent and really good fun."
The two women became friends. "We'd hang out together and, one Friday night, we were at her place watching videos and a call came in, two blokes wanting two girls."
Nikki's friend said, "Are you game?" and Nikki thought, "Why not?", and it was more pleasant than she expected.
"The two guys were quite young — definitely over age, but young — and their parents were home, so we had to sneak in and they were saying, 'Shhhh!' because they didn't want to wake their mum and dad," Nikki says.
"The session was half an hour, so 40 minutes later, I was back at my friend's house, sitting on the couch with money in my pocket. And my friend said, 'What did you think of that?' and I said, 'I loved it!'''
Nikki started work the next day and has never really stopped. She told her parents pretty much immediately. Her dad said, "But why?"
"And I said, 'Well, why not?'," Nikki says. "And Mum was absolutely fine. In fact, she told me that one of my ancestors, during the war in England, provided servicemen with favours in exchange for rations. So it runs in the family!"
Perhaps you're thinking, "Well, that's all very well, but Nikki has ruined her life. How does she ever hope to have a proper relationship?" So here's the next surprise — Nikki is married. She met her husband, Mark, in a bar in San Diego in 1997. He was in the US Navy and she was on holiday.
"He didn't know I was Australian when he came over to talk," Nikki says, "but he'd been to Australia with the navy. We hit it off. I didn't tell him I was a sex worker straight away. We went for a walk together that evening. The next day, we went to Sea World."
Nikki's up-front about what she wanted — "I was looking for a one-night stand!" — but Mark said no.
Worse, he was due to ship out in the next few days, "but then he was calling me from every port," Nikki says. After about two weeks, she told him, "I'm a sex worker."
His response? "He said, 'That's cool.' He'd been around. He's in the Navy! And he understands that what I do is not who I am."

Nikki Lee4 days ago
Hello – I’m Nikki Cox – the Sex Worker featured in this introductory portion of the Australian Women’s Weekly article “When Sex is Your Day Job”. Myself, along with 4 of my Sex Worker sisters – Artemesia, Sandi, Rachel and Laurell were extended the honour of being interviewed and photographed by the magazine for this Real Life feature article & we thank the Australian Women’s Weekly and Caroline Overington in particular for being progressive enough to want to help create an understanding of us as real live Women. We accepted this honour of being interviewed because it was intended to bring to light the issue of the Queensland Government passing an anti-discrimination law in November 2012 which makes it lawful to discriminate against us - a set group of people who are a minority group - in regards to accommodation.

The Government has made it so that any accommodation providers in Queensland can deny or evict a suspected Sex Worker from any form of rented premises, not just motel and hotels but our rental homes, apartments and business premises – whether we are working from these accommodations or travelling on personal family business just because we are Sex Workers. This kind of discrimination has not existed in regards to accommodation since the 1970’s when people of Aboriginal origin were not permitted to rent a motel room. They can also legally treat us unfairly in the process of denying and/or evicting us from said premises.

This has all come about because one sex worker stood up for her legal rights and won an anti-discrimination case against a Queensland motel. The Qld Attorney-General Jarrod Bleijie didn’t like this, so he decided he would use his political power to change what he didn’t like. He didn’t stop to think that we run businesses too. His stand is that he needs to protect the majority from the minority and that if we don’t like it – leave the industry.

The anti-discrimination legislation now directly discriminates against us in regards to accommodation and working from said accommodation yet other occupations such as photographers, media, politicians, travelling salesmen, employment recruiters conducting job interviews can and do work from private homes and apartments, motel and hotel rooms and rented business premises – yet we can be removed from all these places based on our occupation.

Legal sole operator Sex Workers have been recognized as a person before the law under the Qld Prostitution Act since 1999 and in doing this it afforded us with more equal protection in regards to human and civil rights. Prostitution is a lawful occupation and is federally recognized by the Australian Taxation Office.

Please read the whole article in the March issue of the magazine as our attempt at awareness has seemed to have gotten lost in the age old debate about Sex Workers. Like technology – we have evolved.

I am not going to address any individual person’s opinion – it is your opinion and in my world – I believe that everyone has the right to their opinion. I know nothing of your life or current stressors therefore I have no right to comment on your opinion based on my momentary reaction in reading them as there may be more going on in your life that caused you to vent your dislike, discomfort and hatred of what I represent.

I do wish to address directly is to correct 2 errors. I was 25 when I saw my first client not 23 years old and secondly my husband is no longer in the US Navy – he works domestically here in Australia.

People ask me why did I become a sex worker – my answer is simple: Why else does somebody work? Money! I work to earn a living. I had no other reason for entering this industry – sorry for being so boring.
I do enjoy meeting new people & I enjoy the freedom this job enables me to have. I enjoy my lovely peer Sex Worker friends and the community we have built. Not long ago, we were working in complete darkness and separation – nobody knew anybody else and we had no support – no one to turn to. Since the inception of social media – we have been able to come together and love and support each other and create a sisterhood and brotherhood of sex workers.

The sex industry is messy and complicated and is weakened by inequality. We can work together towards a better future for the sex industry and for the people who choose to work within this industry through education, understanding and tolerance.

I am passionate about the sex industry. I care deeply for its wellbeing and for its future because it is my future and I will continue to be heard whether people want to listen to me or not. We are here – we have always been here and we always will be here.

By the Qld Government selecting a minority group such as Sex Workers and by saying it is ok to discriminate against us and to treat us “unfavourably” in the process is just not the Australian way.

Thank you for reading the article :)
That was 1997. The couple got married in 2001 and they're still together. Nikki says her husband has "never, never, never" been jealous, "just like I'm not jealous of the trucks he fixes. For us, it's normal.
I will come home and he might say, 'How was your day?' I'll say, 'Busy, I saw four people, or five people', and he'll say, 'Wow, that is a good day!' The most important people in my life don't discriminate against me. They love me for who I am."
Nikki Lee4 days ago
Hello – I’m Nikki Cox – the Sex Worker featured in this introductory portion of the Australian Women’s Weekly article “When Sex is Your Day Job”. Myself, along with 4 of my Sex Worker sisters – Artemesia, Sandi, Rachel and Laurell were extended the honour of being interviewed and photographed by the magazine for this Real Life feature article & we thank the Australian Women’s Weekly and Caroline Overington in particular for being progressive enough to want to help create an understanding of us as real live Women. We accepted this honour of being interviewed because it was intended to bring to light the issue of the Queensland Government passing an anti-discrimination law in November 2012 which makes it lawful to discriminate against us - a set group of people who are a minority group - in regards to accommodation.

The Government has made it so that any accommodation providers in Queensland can deny or evict a suspected Sex Worker from any form of rented premises, not just motel and hotels but our rental homes, apartments and business premises – whether we are working from these accommodations or travelling on personal family business just because we are Sex Workers. This kind of discrimination has not existed in regards to accommodation since the 1970’s when people of Aboriginal origin were not permitted to rent a motel room. They can also legally treat us unfairly in the process of denying and/or evicting us from said premises.

This has all come about because one sex worker stood up for her legal rights and won an anti-discrimination case against a Queensland motel. The Qld Attorney-General Jarrod Bleijie didn’t like this, so he decided he would use his political power to change what he didn’t like. He didn’t stop to think that we run businesses too. His stand is that he needs to protect the majority from the minority and that if we don’t like it – leave the industry.

The anti-discrimination legislation now directly discriminates against us in regards to accommodation and working from said accommodation yet other occupations such as photographers, media, politicians, travelling salesmen, employment recruiters conducting job interviews can and do work from private homes and apartments, motel and hotel rooms and rented business premises – yet we can be removed from all these places based on our occupation.

Legal sole operator Sex Workers have been recognized as a person before the law under the Qld Prostitution Act since 1999 and in doing this it afforded us with more equal protection in regards to human and civil rights. Prostitution is a lawful occupation and is federally recognized by the Australian Taxation Office.

Please read the whole article in the March issue of the magazine as our attempt at awareness has seemed to have gotten lost in the age old debate about Sex Workers. Like technology – we have evolved.

I am not going to address any individual person’s opinion – it is your opinion and in my world – I believe that everyone has the right to their opinion. I know nothing of your life or current stressors therefore I have no right to comment on your opinion based on my momentary reaction in reading them as there may be more going on in your life that caused you to vent your dislike, discomfort and hatred of what I represent.

I do wish to address directly is to correct 2 errors. I was 25 when I saw my first client not 23 years old and secondly my husband is no longer in the US Navy – he works domestically here in Australia.

People ask me why did I become a sex worker – my answer is simple: Why else does somebody work? Money! I work to earn a living. I had no other reason for entering this industry – sorry for being so boring.
I do enjoy meeting new people & I enjoy the freedom this job enables me to have. I enjoy my lovely peer Sex Worker friends and the community we have built. Not long ago, we were working in complete darkness and separation – nobody knew anybody else and we had no support – no one to turn to. Since the inception of social media – we have been able to come together and love and support each other and create a sisterhood and brotherhood of sex workers.

The sex industry is messy and complicated and is weakened by inequality. We can work together towards a better future for the sex industry and for the people who choose to work within this industry through education, understanding and tolerance.

I am passionate about the sex industry. I care deeply for its wellbeing and for its future because it is my future and I will continue to be heard whether people want to listen to me or not. We are here – we have always been here and we always will be here.

By the Qld Government selecting a minority group such as Sex Workers and by saying it is ok to discriminate against us and to treat us “unfavourably” in the process is just not the Australian way.

Thank you for reading the article :


Nikki Lee4 days ago
Hello – I’m Nikki Cox – the Sex Worker featured in this introductory portion of the Australian Women’s Weekly article “When Sex is Your Day Job”. Myself, along with 4 of my Sex Worker sisters – Artemesia, Sandi, Rachel and Laurell were extended the honour of being interviewed and photographed by the magazine for this Real Life feature article & we thank the Australian Women’s Weekly and Caroline Overington in particular for being progressive enough to want to help create an understanding of us as real live Women. We accepted this honour of being interviewed because it was intended to bring to light the issue of the Queensland Government passing an anti-discrimination law in November 2012 which makes it lawful to discriminate against us - a set group of people who are a minority group - in regards to accommodation.

The Government has made it so that any accommodation providers in Queensland can deny or evict a suspected Sex Worker from any form of rented premises, not just motel and hotels but our rental homes, apartments and business premises – whether we are working from these accommodations or travelling on personal family business just because we are Sex Workers. This kind of discrimination has not existed in regards to accommodation since the 1970’s when people of Aboriginal origin were not permitted to rent a motel room. They can also legally treat us unfairly in the process of denying and/or evicting us from said premises.

This has all come about because one sex worker stood up for her legal rights and won an anti-discrimination case against a Queensland motel. The Qld Attorney-General Jarrod Bleijie didn’t like this, so he decided he would use his political power to change what he didn’t like. He didn’t stop to think that we run businesses too. His stand is that he needs to protect the majority from the minority and that if we don’t like it – leave the industry.

The anti-discrimination legislation now directly discriminates against us in regards to accommodation and working from said accommodation yet other occupations such as photographers, media, politicians, travelling salesmen, employment recruiters conducting job interviews can and do work from private homes and apartments, motel and hotel rooms and rented business premises – yet we can be removed from all these places based on our occupation.

Legal sole operator Sex Workers have been recognized as a person before the law under the Qld Prostitution Act since 1999 and in doing this it afforded us with more equal protection in regards to human and civil rights. Prostitution is a lawful occupation and is federally recognized by the Australian Taxation Office.

Please read the whole article in the March issue of the magazine as our attempt at awareness has seemed to have gotten lost in the age old debate about Sex Workers. Like technology – we have evolved.

I am not going to address any individual person’s opinion – it is your opinion and in my world – I believe that everyone has the right to their opinion. I know nothing of your life or current stressors therefore I have no right to comment on your opinion based on my momentary reaction in reading them as there may be more going on in your life that caused you to vent your dislike, discomfort and hatred of what I represent.

I do wish to address directly is to correct 2 errors. I was 25 when I saw my first client not 23 years old and secondly my husband is no longer in the US Navy – he works domestically here in Australia.

People ask me why did I become a sex worker – my answer is simple: Why else does somebody work? Money! I work to earn a living. I had no other reason for entering this industry – sorry for being so boring.
I do enjoy meeting new people & I enjoy the freedom this job enables me to have. I enjoy my lovely peer Sex Worker friends and the community we have built. Not long ago, we were working in complete darkness and separation – nobody knew anybody else and we had no support – no one to turn to. Since the inception of social media – we have been able to come together and love and support each other and create a sisterhood and brotherhood of sex workers.

The sex industry is messy and complicated and is weakened by inequality. We can work together towards a better future for the sex industry and for the people who choose to work within this industry through education, understanding and tolerance.

I am passionate about the sex industry. I care deeply for its wellbeing and for its future because it is my future and I will continue to be heard whether people want to listen to me or not. We are here – we have always been here and we always will be here.

By the Qld Government selecting a minority group such as Sex Workers and by saying it is ok to discriminate against us and to treat us “unfavourably” in the process is just not the Australian way.

Thank you for reading the article :)



Nikki Lee4 days ago
Hello – I’m Nikki Cox – the Sex Worker featured in this introductory portion of the Australian Women’s Weekly article “When Sex is Your Day Job”. Myself, along with 4 of my Sex Worker sisters – Artemesia, Sandi, Rachel and Laurell were extended the honour of being interviewed and photographed by the magazine for this Real Life feature article & we thank the Australian Women’s Weekly and Caroline Overington in particular for being progressive enough to want to help create an understanding of us as real live Women. We accepted this honour of being interviewed because it was intended to bring to light the issue of the Queensland Government passing an anti-discrimination law in November 2012 which makes it lawful to discriminate against us - a set group of people who are a minority group - in regards to accommodation.

The Government has made it so that any accommodation providers in Queensland can deny or evict a suspected Sex Worker from any form of rented premises, not just motel and hotels but our rental homes, apartments and business premises – whether we are working from these accommodations or travelling on personal family business just because we are Sex Workers. This kind of discrimination has not existed in regards to accommodation since the 1970’s when people of Aboriginal origin were not permitted to rent a motel room. They can also legally treat us unfairly in the process of denying and/or evicting us from said premises.

This has all come about because one sex worker stood up for her legal rights and won an anti-discrimination case against a Queensland motel. The Qld Attorney-General Jarrod Bleijie didn’t like this, so he decided he would use his political power to change what he didn’t like. He didn’t stop to think that we run businesses too. His stand is that he needs to protect the majority from the minority and that if we don’t like it – leave the industry.

The anti-discrimination legislation now directly discriminates against us in regards to accommodation and working from said accommodation yet other occupations such as photographers, media, politicians, travelling salesmen, employment recruiters conducting job interviews can and do work from private homes and apartments, motel and hotel rooms and rented business premises – yet we can be removed from all these places based on our occupation.

Legal sole operator Sex Workers have been recognized as a person before the law under the Qld Prostitution Act since 1999 and in doing this it afforded us with more equal protection in regards to human and civil rights. Prostitution is a lawful occupation and is federally recognized by the Australian Taxation Office.

Please read the whole article in the March issue of the magazine as our attempt at awareness has seemed to have gotten lost in the age old debate about Sex Workers. Like technology – we have evolved.

I am not going to address any individual person’s opinion – it is your opinion and in my world – I believe that everyone has the right to their opinion. I know nothing of your life or current stressors therefore I have no right to comment on your opinion based on my momentary reaction in reading them as there may be more going on in your life that caused you to vent your dislike, discomfort and hatred of what I represent.

I do wish to address directly is to correct 2 errors. I was 25 when I saw my first client not 23 years old and secondly my husband is no longer in the US Navy – he works domestically here in Australia.

People ask me why did I become a sex worker – my answer is simple: Why else does somebody work? Money! I work to earn a living. I had no other reason for entering this industry – sorry for being so boring.
I do enjoy meeting new people & I enjoy the freedom this job enables me to have. I enjoy my lovely peer Sex Worker friends and the community we have built. Not long ago, we were working in complete darkness and separation – nobody knew anybody else and we had no support – no one to turn to. Since the inception of social media – we have been able to come together and love and support each other and create a sisterhood and brotherhood of sex workers.

The sex industry is messy and complicated and is weakened by inequality. We can work together towards a better future for the sex industry and for the people who choose to work within this industry through education, understanding and tolerance.

I am passionate about the sex industry. I care deeply for its wellbeing and for its future because it is my future and I will continue to be heard whether people want to listen to me or not. We are here – we have always been here and we always will be here.

By the Qld Government selecting a minority group such as Sex Workers and by saying it is ok to discriminate against us and to treat us “unfavourably” in the process is just not the Australian way.

Thank you for reading the article :)
Nikki Lee4 days ago
Hello – I’m Nikki Cox – the Sex Worker featured in this introductory portion of the Australian Women’s Weekly article “When Sex is Your Day Job”. Myself, along with 4 of my Sex Worker sisters – Artemesia, Sandi, Rachel and Laurell were extended the honour of being interviewed and photographed by the magazine for this Real Life feature article & we thank the Australian Women’s Weekly and Caroline Overington in particular for being progressive enough to want to help create an understanding of us as real live Women. We accepted this honour of being interviewed because it was intended to bring to light the issue of the Queensland Government passing an anti-discrimination law in November 2012 which makes it lawful to discriminate against us - a set group of people who are a minority group - in regards to accommodation.

The Government has made it so that any accommodation providers in Queensland can deny or evict a suspected Sex Worker from any form of rented premises, not just motel and hotels but our rental homes, apartments and business premises – whether we are working from these accommodations or travelling on personal family business just because we are Sex Workers. This kind of discrimination has not existed in regards to accommodation since the 1970’s when people of Aboriginal origin were not permitted to rent a motel room. They can also legally treat us unfairly in the process of denying and/or evicting us from said premises.

This has all come about because one sex worker stood up for her legal rights and won an anti-discrimination case against a Queensland motel. The Qld Attorney-General Jarrod Bleijie didn’t like this, so he decided he would use his political power to change what he didn’t like. He didn’t stop to think that we run businesses too. His stand is that he needs to protect the majority from the minority and that if we don’t like it – leave the industry.

The anti-discrimination legislation now directly discriminates against us in regards to accommodation and working from said accommodation yet other occupations such as photographers, media, politicians, travelling salesmen, employment recruiters conducting job interviews can and do work from private homes and apartments, motel and hotel rooms and rented business premises – yet we can be removed from all these places based on our occupation.

Legal sole operator Sex Workers have been recognized as a person before the law under the Qld Prostitution Act since 1999 and in doing this it afforded us with more equal protection in regards to human and civil rights. Prostitution is a lawful occupation and is federally recognized by the Australian Taxation Office.

Please read the whole article in the March issue of the magazine as our attempt at awareness has seemed to have gotten lost in the age old debate about Sex Workers. Like technology – we have evolved.

I am not going to address any individual person’s opinion – it is your opinion and in my world – I believe that everyone has the right to their opinion. I know nothing of your life or current stressors therefore I have no right to comment on your opinion based on my momentary reaction in reading them as there may be more going on in your life that caused you to vent your dislike, discomfort and hatred of what I represent.

I do wish to address directly is to correct 2 errors. I was 25 when I saw my first client not 23 years old and secondly my husband is no longer in the US Navy – he works domestically here in Australia.

People ask me why did I become a sex worker – my answer is simple: Why else does somebody work? Money! I work to earn a living. I had no other reason for entering this industry – sorry for being so boring.
I do enjoy meeting new people & I enjoy the freedom this job enables me to have. I enjoy my lovely peer Sex Worker friends and the community we have built. Not long ago, we were working in complete darkness and separation – nobody knew anybody else and we had no support – no one to turn to. Since the inception of social media – we have been able to come together and love and support each other and create a sisterhood and brotherhood of sex workers.

The sex industry is messy and complicated and is weakened by inequality. We can work together towards a better future for the sex industry and for the people who choose to work within this industry through education, understanding and tolerance.

I am passionate about the sex industry. I care deeply for its wellbeing and for its future because it is my future and I will continue to be heard whether people want to listen to me or not. We are here – we have always been here and we always will be here.

By the Qld Government selecting a minority group such as Sex Workers and by saying it is ok to discriminate against us and to treat us “unfavourably” in the process is just not the Australian way.

Thank you for reading the article :)

Nikki Lee4 days ago
Hello – I’m Nikki Cox – the Sex Worker featured in this introductory portion of the Australian Women’s Weekly article “When Sex is Your Day Job”. Myself, along with 4 of my Sex Worker sisters – Artemesia, Sandi, Rachel and Laurell were extended the honour of being interviewed and photographed by the magazine for this Real Life feature article & we thank the Australian Women’s Weekly and Caroline Overington in particular for being progressive enough to want to help create an understanding of us as real live Women. We accepted this honour of being interviewed because it was intended to bring to light the issue of the Queensland Government passing an anti-discrimination law in November 2012 which makes it lawful to discriminate against us - a set group of people who are a minority group - in regards to accommodation.

The Government has made it so that any accommodation providers in Queensland can deny or evict a suspected Sex Worker from any form of rented premises, not just motel and hotels but our rental homes, apartments and business premises – whether we are working from these accommodations or travelling on personal family business just because we are Sex Workers. This kind of discrimination has not existed in regards to accommodation since the 1970’s when people of Aboriginal origin were not permitted to rent a motel room. They can also legally treat us unfairly in the process of denying and/or evicting us from said premises.

This has all come about because one sex worker stood up for her legal rights and won an anti-discrimination case against a Queensland motel. The Qld Attorney-General Jarrod Bleijie didn’t like this, so he decided he would use his political power to change what he didn’t like. He didn’t stop to think that we run businesses too. His stand is that he needs to protect the majority from the minority and that if we don’t like it – leave the industry.

The anti-discrimination legislation now directly discriminates against us in regards to accommodation and working from said accommodation yet other occupations such as photographers, media, politicians, travelling salesmen, employment recruiters conducting job interviews can and do work from private homes and apartments, motel and hotel rooms and rented business premises – yet we can be removed from all these places based on our occupation.

Legal sole operator Sex Workers have been recognized as a person before the law under the Qld Prostitution Act since 1999 and in doing this it afforded us with more equal protection in regards to human and civil rights. Prostitution is a lawful occupation and is federally recognized by the Australian Taxation Office.

Please read the whole article in the March issue of the magazine as our attempt at awareness has seemed to have gotten lost in the age old debate about Sex Workers. Like technology – we have evolved.

I am not going to address any individual person’s opinion – it is your opinion and in my world – I believe that everyone has the right to their opinion. I know nothing of your life or current stressors therefore I have no right to comment on your opinion based on my momentary reaction in reading them as there may be more going on in your life that caused you to vent your dislike, discomfort and hatred of what I represent.

I do wish to address directly is to correct 2 errors. I was 25 when I saw my first client not 23 years old and secondly my husband is no longer in the US Navy – he works domestically here in Australia.

People ask me why did I become a sex worker – my answer is simple: Why else does somebody work? Money! I work to earn a living. I had no other reason for entering this industry – sorry for being so boring.
I do enjoy meeting new people & I enjoy the freedom this job enables me to have. I enjoy my lovely peer Sex Worker friends and the community we have built. Not long ago, we were working in complete darkness and separation – nobody knew anybody else and we had no support – no one to turn to. Since the inception of social media – we have been able to come together and love and support each other and create a sisterhood and brotherhood of sex workers.

The sex industry is messy and complicated and is weakened by inequality. We can work together towards a better future for the sex industry and for the people who choose to work within this industry through education, understanding and tolerance.

I am passionate about the sex industry. I care deeply for its wellbeing and for its future because it is my future and I will continue to be heard whether people want to listen to me or not. We are here – we have always been here and we always will be here.

By the Qld Government selecting a minority group such as Sex Workers and by saying it is ok to discriminate against us and to treat us “unfavourably” in the process is just not the Australian wa
Nikki Lee4 days ago
Hello – I’m Nikki Cox – the Sex Worker featured in this introductory portion of the Australian Women’s Weekly article “When Sex is Your Day Job”. Myself, along with 4 of my Sex Worker sisters – Artemesia, Sandi, Rachel and Laurell were extended the honour of being interviewed and photographed by the magazine for this Real Life feature article & we thank the Australian Women’s Weekly and Caroline Overington in particular for being progressive enough to want to help create an understanding of us as real live Women. We accepted this honour of being interviewed because it was intended to bring to light the issue of the Queensland Government passing an anti-discrimination law in November 2012 which makes it lawful to discriminate against us - a set group of people who are a minority group - in regards to accommodation.

The Government has made it so that any accommodation providers in Queensland can deny or evict a suspected Sex Worker from any form of rented premises, not just motel and hotels but our rental homes, apartments and business premises – whether we are working from these accommodations or travelling on personal family business just because we are Sex Workers. This kind of discrimination has not existed in regards to accommodation since the 1970’s when people of Aboriginal origin were not permitted to rent a motel room. They can also legally treat us unfairly in the process of denying and/or evicting us from said premises.

This has all come about because one sex worker stood up for her legal rights and won an anti-discrimination case against a Queensland motel. The Qld Attorney-General Jarrod Bleijie didn’t like this, so he decided he would use his political power to change what he didn’t like. He didn’t stop to think that we run businesses too. His stand is that he needs to protect the majority from the minority and that if we don’t like it – leave the industry.

The anti-discrimination legislation now directly discriminates against us in regards to accommodation and working from said accommodation yet other occupations such as photographers, media, politicians, travelling salesmen, employment recruiters conducting job interviews can and do work from private homes and apartments, motel and hotel rooms and rented business premises – yet we can be removed from all these places based on our occupation.

Legal sole operator Sex Workers have been recognized as a person before the law under the Qld Prostitution Act since 1999 and in doing this it afforded us with more equal protection in regards to human and civil rights. Prostitution is a lawful occupation and is federally recognized by the Australian Taxation Office.

Please read the whole article in the March issue of the magazine as our attempt at awareness has seemed to have gotten lost in the age old debate about Sex Workers. Like technology – we have evolved.

I am not going to address any individual person’s opinion – it is your opinion and in my world – I believe that everyone has the right to their opinion. I know nothing of your life or current stressors therefore I have no right to comment on your opinion based on my momentary reaction in reading them as there may be more going on in your life that caused you to vent your dislike, discomfort and hatred of what I represent.

I do wish to address directly is to correct 2 errors. I was 25 when I saw my first client not 23 years old and secondly my husband is no longer in the US Navy – he works domestically here in Australia.

People ask me why did I become a sex worker – my answer is simple: Why else does somebody work? Money! I work to earn a living. I had no other reason for entering this industry – sorry for being so boring.
I do enjoy meeting new people & I enjoy the freedom this job enables me to have. I enjoy my lovely peer Sex Worker friends and the community we have built. Not long ago, we were working in complete darkness and separation – nobody knew anybody else and we had no support – no one to turn to. Since the inception of social media – we have been able to come together and love and support each other and create a sisterhood and brotherhood of sex workers.

The sex industry is messy and complicated and is weakened by inequality. We can work together towards a better future for the sex industry and for the people who choose to work within this industry through education, understanding and tolerance.

I am passionate about the sex industry. I care deeply for its wellbeing and for its future because it is my future and I will continue to be heard whether people want to listen to me or not. We are here – we have always been here and we always will be here.

By the Qld Government selecting a minority group such as Sex Workers and by saying it is ok to discriminate against us and to treat us “unfavourably” in the process is just not the Australian way.

Thank you for reading the article :)Read more of this story in the March issue of The Australian Women's 

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